Talk but no action

The eurozone periphery remains in the eye of the storm but markets may have to wait before any concrete action is taken. The possibility of increasing the size of the bailout fund (EFSF), preparation of new European bank stress tests and/or allowing the EFSF to purchase eurozone government debt are all on the table but so far agreement has been lacking. Ministers apparently rejected the idea of increasing the size of the fund from EUR 440 billion to EUR 750 billion whilst disagreement over stricter criteria may also be hampering any progress.

Nonetheless, the EUR has found renewed support, helped by the firm German IFO investor confidence survey and news that Russia is looking to buy EFSF bonds. EUR/USD upside may be face a hurdle around 1.3500 over the short term and gains above this level are likely to be difficult to sustain given the ongoing uncertainties about the EFSF none of which are likely to be resolved anytime soon. The bottom line is that talk but not action will not be sufficient to keep the EUR supported.

GBP is also doing well, partly on the coat tails of a firmer EUR but also in the wake of an acceleration in UK CPI inflation which came in at 3.7% YoY a two year high, surpassing the Bank of England’s (BoE) ceiling for the 10th straight month. Inflation is likely to remain elevated pushing closer to 4% due to the VAT hike to 20% which came into effect at the beginning of this year. The data puts the BoE in a difficult situation testing the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) expectation that the jump in inflation will prove temporary. However, the market is increasing taking the stance that a rate hike is going to take placer sooner rather than later, with a growing probability of a rate hike.

Since the end of last year there has been a 25bps spread widening (between 2nd contract rate futures) as markets have become more hawkish on UK interest rate expectations. This has coincided with an increasing correlation with GBP/USD resulting in the currency pair cracking above the psychologically important 1.60 level. Much will depend on whether the BoE’s predictions come true. If inflation remains sticky on the upside the Bank may be forced into an earlier tightening. Whether this is good news for GBP will depend on the economy. The worst case scenario is premature monetary tightening just as austerity measures start to bite.

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