USD buoyant

After finally returning from a two week trip visiting clients across North America it appears that the USD continues to remain in buoyant mood. I have been highlighting the prospects for a stronger USD against major currencies for some time and this has been borne out by the strong USD performance since early February.

Despite a lackluster performance for US stocks overnight overall sentiment remains largely upbeat as reflected by the fact that my risk barometer has breached its lower threshold and has moved into risk loving territory. Similarly the VIX fear gauge is trading at multi year lows although it did move higher overnight.

The sharp drop in UK industrial production and a warning by the Bundesbank’s Weidmann that the Eurozone crisis was not over added a dose of caution to the market. On a more positive note the Baltic Dry Index is at its highest level so far this year, sending a positive signal for global growth expectations.

While there is still much wrangling in the US over budget proposals, and in Europe, Italian political uncertainty continues, markets remain focused on the positives of improving growth against the background of highly accommodative monetary policies. Nonetheless, the divergence between the US and Europe in terms of growth is set to continue. A likely bigger than forecast increase in US February retail sales in contrast to a bigger than forecast fall in Eurozone industrial production in January will attest to this.

EUR/USD has managed to garner a semblance of stability over recent days, with the currency pair finding it difficult to sustain any decline below the psychologically important 1.3000 level. The drop in EUR/USD over much of February has been more aggressive than implied by the performance of Eurozone peripheral bonds but this is no surprise given that this is not the biggest influence on the currency.

Instead the explanation for the EUR decline is found when viewing the move in US 2 year Treasury yields relative to 2 year bunds. The strong correlation with EUR/USD highlights this relationship, reflecting the impact of lower bund yields and higher Treasury yields. The EUR’s stability over recent days is therefore a function of a slight drop in the US yield advantage.

Given that the trend of firmer US data and weaker Eurozone data is set to continue, this stability is likely to be short lived. Our quantitative model suggests EUR/USD may rally in the short term but we suggest selling into it.

GBP/USD’s decline has continued unabated and there appear to be little to stand in the way of further weakness apart perhaps from the fact that a lot of bad news is priced in. Sentiment for GBP has clearly deteriorated as reflected in the CFTC IMM data revealing four straight weeks of negative positioning. The deviation with the 3 month average positioning has widened significantly, highlighting the pace of the move but also that the drop is beginning to look excessive.

Nonetheless, the bigger than expected drop in January industrial production data revealed yesterday has helped to compound the negativity towards the currency in the wake of deteriorating economic data and in turn heightened expectations of more BoE quantitative easing. Strong technical support around GBP/USD 1.4767 may hold in the short term but momentum indicators are showing no sign of a slowing in GBP selling pressure.

For GBP bulls (if there any left) there may be more value in looking to eventually re-enter long positions against EUR but we would not rush into this trade. .

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