Hawkish Central Banks

It was a soft end to the week for global equities, while the US dollar (USD) rallied further as US Treasury yields pushed higher.  Neither the move in Treasuries or the USD shows any sign of slowing, and if anything, US inflation data will keep the upward pressure on yields and USD intact this week.  Clearly, most currencies, expect notably the Russian rouble are suffering at the hands of a strong USD though Asian currencies have been less pressured of late compared to other currencies. 

The surge in US Treasury yields has been particularly stark and fuelled pressure across many other markets.  The USD (DXY) has been a key beneficiary of the rise in US yields, with the currency propelled to its highest level since May 2020.  USDJPY remains one of the most highly correlated currency pairs to yield differentials and with Japan persisting in its defence of Yield Curve Control (YCC) it looks like USDJPY will continue to move higher, with 130 moving into sight. 

There’s plenty of central bank action this week and much of it likely in a hawkish direction, including in New Zealand (Wed), Canada (Wed), Singapore, Korea, Euro area, and Turkey (all Thu).  Tightening is expected from several of these central banks.  The consensus is expecting a 25-basis point (bp) hike in policy rates in New Zealand, but a significant minority is looking for a 50bp hike

In Korea, the consensus is split between no change and a 25bp hike, with the risks skewed towards the latter amid strong inflation pressures and high household debt, even though the new central bank governor may not be installed at this meeting. Similarly, a hawkish outturn from the Monetary Authority of Singapore is likely, with a steepening, re-centering and possible widening of the Singapore dollar nominal effective exchange rate band expected.  Note that Singapore’s monetary policy is carried out via its exchange rate.

In Canada, a 50bp hike in policy rates is likely, while the Bank may announce balance-sheet run off in a likely hawkish statement in the wake of stronger readings both on the growth and inflation front. Last but not least, the European Central Bank (ECB) may announce an early end to its quantitative easing and prepare markets for rate hikes, possibly as early as June.  In contrast, Turkey is likely to continue to maintain its monetary policy on hold amid some stability in its currency. 

On the data front, US March CPI inflation data will be among the key releases this week.  Another high reading is likely, with the consensus expectation at 8.4% year-on-year, from 7.9% previously.  The data will not make for pleasant reading, with headlines likely to highlight that US inflation is back at over 40- year highs.  While the data will likely keep up the pressure on interest rate markets, I would caution that a lot is in the price.       

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