Tarnishing The Euro

I am just finishing up a client trip in Japan and waiting to take a flight back to Hong Kong. The time ahead of the flight has allowed some reflection on my meetings here. One thing that has been particularly evident is the strong interest in all events European. Some I have spoken to have wondered out loud whether this the beginning of the end of the European project.  At the least it is evident that fiscal/debt problems in Greece and elsewhere in Europe have tarnished the image of the EUR.

Markets continue to gyrate on any news about Greece and the potential for support from the Europe Union and/or IMF. The divergent views between European countries about how to deal with the problem has intensified, suggesting that reaching an agreement will not be easy. Some countries including the UK and Sweden have suggested enrolling the help of the IMF but this has been resisted by other European countries. Germany and France are trying to rally support ahead of today’s crucial meeting of European officials.

The EUR reacted positively to news that some form of support package is being considered but nothing concrete has appeared yet, leaving markets on edge. The EUR has been heavily sold over recent weeks; speculative market positioning reached a record low in the latest week’s CFTC Commitment of Traders’ IMM report. The fact that EUR positioning has become so negative suggests that the EUR could rebound sharply in the event that some support package for Greece is announced.

Any package will not come without strings attached, however, as European officials will want to avoid any moral hazard. A couple of options hinted at by German officials include fresh loans or some form of plan to purchase Greek debt. Either way, any solution to Greece’s problems will not be quick and will likely result in a sharp contraction in economic activity as the government cuts spending especially as Greece does not have the option of the old remedy of devaluing its currency. Meanwhile, strikes and social tensions in the country could escalate further. A solution for Greece will only constitutes around 2.5% of eurozone GDP will also not prevent focus from continuing to shift to Portugal, Spain and other countries with fiscal problems despite comments by Moody’s ratings agency to differentiate between the countries.

Even if the EUR rebounds on any positive news about support for Greece any relief is likely to prove temporary and will provide better levels to sell into to play for a medium term decline in the currency. Ongoing fiscal concerns, a likely slower pace of economic recovery, divergencies in views of European officials, and the fact that the EUR is still overvalued suggests that the currency will depreciate over much of 2010, with a move to around EUR/USD 1.30 or below in prospect over coming months.

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