Strong US Jobs Data And Hawkish Fed Speak Keeps Tightening Expectations Elevated

US bond yields rose sharply on Friday, particularly on the front end of the curve in the wake of the above consensus US July jobs report, which showed a strong 528,000 (consensus 250,000) increase in non-farm payrolls and the unemployment rate dropping to 3.5% (consensus 3.6%).  The three-month moving average of US jobs gains now total 437,000. However, the drop in the unemployment rate was due in part to a drop in the participation rate so it wasn’t all good news.  Wage growth was firm, with average hourly earnings up 5.2% y/y. Overall the data highlighted a still strong jobs market and markets are now pricing in a greater probability of 75 basis points hike by the Federal Reserve at its September meeting. 

The firm US jobs data accompanied hawkish Fed speak over the past week, with various Fed officials pushing back against more dovish rate expectations that had been built into markets over recent weeks. The Fed’s Evans, Kashkari and Daly are scheduled to speak this week and are likely to maintain the run of hawkish Fed comments, pushing back against residual expectation of an early peak in the Fed Funds rate. Despite weaker closes for equities on Friday, stocks still ended higher over the week, but may struggle given the renewed hawkish shift in rate expectations.  That said, with the bulk of second quarter earnings out of the way equities have held up well. 

The data and Fed speakers also give further reason to be cautious on extrapolating the recent pull back in the US dollar, with the currency bouncing at the end of the week and starting this week on a firm note.  The USD index has bounced off trend line support and has bounced off its 50-day moving average level, which has been a good support over recent months.  In the near term some consolidation in the USD is likely though this week’s US CPI inflation report is likely to provide more direction.  Conversely, while the euro appears to have found a short-term bottom, it’s hard to see a significant bounce in the currency. 

Data over the weekend revealed a stronger than expected increase in Chinese exports in July at 18% y/y (cons. 14.1%) and lower imports at 2.3% y/y (cons. 4.0%), resulting in a surge in the trade surplus to $101.26bn (cons. $89.04bn).  The weak imports data highlights ongoing pressure on domestic demand while exports will likely struggle to maintain firm momentum amid a likely slowing in external demand.  China’s July inflation data this will be in focus (Wed) this week while more reaction by China to last week’s visit by Speaker to Pelosi to Taiwan will also be expected. 

In the US, the key data will be the July CPI report (Wed); the consensus expects elevated readings of 8.7%/6.1% y/y for total/core prices.  Headline CPI will have moderated from June, but core CPI is likely to have ticked higher.  Long term inflation expectations as measured in the University of Michigan August confidence survey (Fri) will also be in focus.  On the policy rate front, a 25bp hike from the Bank of Thailand kicks of its tightening cycle (Wed) and a 75bp hike from Mexico’s central bank, Banxico.  However, unlike Thailand Banxico is likely nearing the end of its tightening cycle.   

Relief For Risk Assets, But How Long Will It Last?

Last week was one of considerable relief for risk assets; US equities recorded solid gains, with the S&P and Nasdaq up 6.2% and 8.2% respectively.  Conversely, oil (Brent) dropped by over 4% and the US dollar index dropped by around 1%.  Reflecting the improvement in sentiment, the VIX “fear gauge” has now dropped by around a third over the last couple of weeks to settle below 25.0.  The MOVE index of interest rates volatility has also fallen sharply.  All of this in a week when the Federal Reserve hiked policy rates by a quarter percent and promised more to come in a hawkish meeting. 

A lot of the bad news was clearly in the price including the pricing of several Fed rate hikes, but with the war in Ukraine ongoing, peace talks appearing to make little progress, stagflation fears intensifying and a renewed rise in COVID cases in many countries due to a new variant (BA.2), we’re still very far from an all clear signal for risk assets.  Separately, the US administration appears no closer to persuading China into supporting a stronger stance against Russia; no statement was issued after the call between Presidents Biden and Xi at the end of last week.

China’s neutral stance on the war in Ukraine still poses risks to its markets as indicated by the sharp outflows of foreign portfolio capital over recent weeks.  After pledges made by the authorities to provide much needed stability to China’s economy and markets, the coming weeks will be scrutinised for follow up action.  On this note, China’s Loan Prime Rates (LPR) outcome today was in focus.  There was a small chance that China’s Banks would lower their fixings but after the unchanged Medium Term Lending Facility (MLF) outcome last week, the prospects of a cut had lessened. Nonetheless despite no change in policy today, recent official pledges of support suggest its only a matter of time before there is a cut in the policy rate.

Over the rest of the week there will be several other central bank decisions in focus, mostly in emerging markets, including in Hungary (Tue), Philippines, Norway, South Africa and Mexico (all on Thu).  Most are expected to hike rates. A 25bp hike in Norway is likely, 50bp hike in Mexico, 25bp hike in South Africa and 150bp hike in Hungary.  There will also be several Federal Reserve speakers on tap this week including Chair Powell (Tue), as well as Williams, Bostic, Daly, Mester and Evans.  They are likely to provide more colour following last week’s Fed rate hike, with focus on comments on balance sheet reduction and the pace of further tightening ahead.  

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