Powell Keeps The Risk Rally Going

It felt as though markets spent all of last week waiting for the Jackson Hole symposium but in the event Federal Reserve Chair Powell didn’t really tell us anything new.  This was good enough for risk assets, with equities ending the week higher and bonds also rallying, with the US Treasury curve bull steepening, setting up a positive start for equity markets this week.  The US dollar came under pressure as Powell did not repeat the hawkish messages of some recent Fed speakers over recent days.

Overall Powell noted that one of the key criteria for tapering has been met, namely “substantial further progress” for inflation while “clear progress” has been met on the second goal of maximum employment. Powell also disassociated the criteria for rate hikes and tapering, with markets continuing to price in the first hike around March 2023. A tapering announcement is likely this year, but September looks too soon. 

The US dollar is likely to remain under pressure this week in the wake of Powell’s comments which ought to bode well for many emerging market currencies.  The potential for a softer than consensus US August jobs report (non-farm payrolls consensus 750k) at the end of the week also suggests that the USD could struggle to make a short term rebound though US interest rate markets, will likely remain supported. 

All of this bodes well for some consolidation in Asian markets though tomorrow’s Chinese August purchasing managers index (PMI) data will provide further direction.  Further moderation in both manufacturing and services PMIs will likely keep up the pressure on the authorities there to avoid renminbi appreciation as well as loosen liquidity likely via another reserve requirement ratio (RRR) cut. 

Other key data this week includes Q2 GDP releases in Australia (Wed), India (Tue), and Canada (Tue), US ISM surveys (Wed) and (Fri), Eurozone inflation data (Tue), and Polish inflation (Tue).  Also keep an eye on German political developments; the election is less than one month away and recent polling has shown that the SPD has pulled ahead of Merkel’s CDU for the first time in 15 years, raising the possibility of a left wing coalition. 

Geopolitical issues, specifically to do with Afghanistan remain a threat to risk appetite as the US deadline for evacuation approaches.  Separately, oil prices could be impacted by Hurricane Ida, which hit the US Gulf Coast yesterday.   

US Dollar On Top – All Eyes On Jackson Hole

Although risk assets rallied at the end of last week, weaker than expected US July retail sales data and China’s July data slate including industrial production and retail sales, helped to intensify growth concerns.  As it is, many indicators are showing that we are past peak growth. US economic surprises are becoming increasingly negative as reflected in the Citi US economic surprise index, which has fallen to its lowest level since May 2020.  Combined with intensifying Delta virus concerns, worsening supply chain pressures and sharply rising freight rates as reflected in the spike in the Baltic Dry Index to its highest since June 2008, it has led to a marked worsening in investor risk appetite.  This has been compounded by China’s regulatory crackdown and rising geopolitical risks in Afghanistan

The US dollar has been a key beneficiary while safe haven demand for Treasuries has increased and commodity prices have come under growing pressure.  Equity markets wobbled last week after a prolonged run up though the pull back in the S&P 500 looked like a healthy correction rather than anything more sinister at this stage.  The moves in the USD have been sharp, with the USD index (DXY) rising to its highest since November 2020 and EURUSD on its way to testing the 1.16 low.  Some Asian currency pairs broke key levels on Friday, with USDCNH breaking through 6.50.  Safe haven currencies such as CHF and JPY are holding up much better, highlighting that USD demand against other currencies is largely due to a rise in risk aversion while currencies such as CAD appear to be pressured by weakening commodity prices.  

This week attention will turn to the Jackson Hole Symposium (Fri) where markets will look for clues to the contours of Fed tapering.  Fed chair Powell is likely to repeat the message from the July minutes, with QE tapering likely by year-end if the labour data continue to strengthen.  Markets will be on the lookout for any further clues on the timing and shape of tapering. Separately the US July Core Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE) report is likely to show a high 3.6% y/y increase though this is unlikely to change the Fed’s perspective on transitory inflation pressures.  Monetary policy decisions in Hungary (Tue) and Korea (Thu) will be in focus, with the former likely to hike by 30bps and the latter on hold, albeit in a close decision.  Ongoing US budget talks and European Central Bank minutes (Thu) will also be in focus. Finally, closer to home New Zealand (Tue) and Australia (Fri) retail sales reports are in focus. 

US Jobs Report Provides Comfort For Markets

The US June jobs report released on Friday provided plenty of comfort for US equity markets. Non-farm payrolls rose by an above consensus 850,000 while the unemployment rate ticked higher to 5.9% from 5.8%.  The strong increase in payrolls helped US equities close out another week in positive mood; S&P 500 rose 0.75% and the Nasdaq gained 0.81% as investors continued to pile back into growth stocks. US Treasury bonds were supported, helped by an increase in the unemployment rate, while the US dollar fell.

Despite the jobs gain, payrolls are still around 6.8 million lower than pre-Covid levels, suggesting a long way to go for a full recovery. Federal Reserve officials will likely need to see several more months of jobs market improvement to achieve their “substantial further progress” tapering criterion.  Overall, the data played into the Fed’s narrative that tapering is still some way off and higher US interest rates even further away, leaving little for markets to fret about.

OPEC+ tensions between Saudi Arabia and UAE have increased, delaying OPEC+ talks to today against the background of oil prices pushing higher above $75 per barrel.  Riyadh along with other OPEC+ members appear keen to increase production over coming months while the UAE supports a short term increase, rather than the end of 2022 which other OPEC members are looking for.

Markets activity is likely to be subdued at the start of the due to the US holiday and there seems to be little to break out of the low volatility environment that we are currently in the midst off, though the US dollar will look to extend recent gains against the background of persistent short market positioning as reflected in the CFTC IMM data.  

This week attention will turn to the Federal Reserve FOMC Minutes of its last meeting (Wed), ISM non-manufacturing survey (Tue), and central bank policy meetings in Australia (Tue) and Poland (Thu) alongside Chinese June inflation (Fri) and credit aggregates data (from Fri). 

Given the sharp market reaction following the less dovish Fed FOMC meeting, markets will look for any further elaboration on the potential timeline for tapering in the Fed Minutes.  While both the RBA in Australia and NBP in Poland are likely to stay on hold, the RBA is likely to strike a dovish tone in its statement and Q&A while the NBP is likely to announce a new set of economic projections.  No shocks are expected from China’s June CPI inflation reading, though producer price inflation, PPI is likely to remain elevated.

Plethora Of Central Banks

This week is a busy one for central bank meetings and data releases.  There are key policy meetings in the US (Wed), followed by Indonesia, Norway, Switzerland, Turkey, Brazil (all on Thu) and Japan (Fri).  None are expected to change policy settings except the BCB in Brazil, with the consensus expecting a 75bp hike there.

There will however, be lot of attention on the language of the statements for any hawkish tinges.  The US Federal Reserve FOMC for instance is likely to continue to highlight that inflation pressures are transitory but could state they have started to discuss some form of progress-dependent tapering plan even as the Fed remains far from actual tapering. 

While markets may be buying the “transitory” inflation story, consumer expectations remain elevated.  The New York Fed survey showed that consumer inflation expectations 3 years out rose to an 8 year high of 3.6% in May while 1-year expectations rose to a record 4%.  However, markets may find some solace from the drop in lumber prices, which have dropped by around 40% since early May though the CRB commodities index remains near multi-year highs.   

Norway’s Norges Bank may start preparing markets for a third quarter rate hike.  In contrast, in Turkey, attention will be on any clues to when the central bank will ease policy amid calls for a cut from President Erdogan. The Bank of Japan is likely to extend COVID aid for businesses while Bank Indonesia is likely to focus on transmission of past easing rather than cut again. 

Key data this week includes US May retail sales (today) for which a monthly decline in headline sales is likely though spending is still likely to have grown strongly over the quarter.  China’s May data dump (Wed) will also garner attention, with healthy gains in both retail sales and industrial production likely, even taking account of base effects. 

Australia’s May jobs report (Thu) is forecast to show an increase though there are downside risks emanating from JobkKeeper’s expiry in May.  Reserve Bank of Australia June minutes (today) and speech by governor Lowe (Thu) will also be scrutinized for thinking on whether RBA will extend the YCC bond to the Nov 24s and quantitative easing commitment. 

There are also several other central bank speeches of importance this week including two speeches by Bank of England governor Bailey, and several European Central Bank speakers. 

Absorbing The Fed’s Message

Markets absorbed a high inflation reading in the form of US core Personal Consumption Expenditure (PCE) price index without flinching at the end of last week, further acknowledgement that the Fed’s “transitory” inflation message is belatedly sinking in to the market’s psyche.  Core PCE inflation exceeded expectations for April, surging 0.7% m/m after a 0.4% gain in March (consensus: 0.6%). On a y/y basis, core PCE inflation surged to 3.1%—its highest level in almost three decades. High inflation readings are likely to persist over the near-term, if for no other reason than base effect, but price pressures will likely ease by the end of the year. 

The market’s sanguine reaction has helped US Treasury yields to continue to consolidate.  Also helping to restrain yields is the fact that positive US economic surprises (data releases versus consensus expectations) are close to their lowest level since June 2020 and barely positive (according to the Citi index), in contrast to euro area economic surprises, a factor that is helping to support the euro.

Cross-asset volatility measures remain very low, with the glut of liquidity continuing to depress volatility across equities, interest rates and FX.  Given that markets’ inflation fears has eased, it is difficult to see what will provoke any spike in volatility in the near term.  All of this this does not bode well for the USD.  Sentiment as reflected in the latest CFTC IMM speculative data on net non-commercial futures USD positions, remains downbeat.  This is corroborated in FX options risk reversal skews (3m, 25d) of USD crosses. 

In particular, USDCNY will be closely watched after strong gains in the renminbi lately.  Chinese officials are trying to prevent or at least slow USD weakness vs. CNY. The latest measure came from China’s central bank, the PBoC instructing banks to increase their FX reserve requirements by 2% to 7% ie to hold more foreign currency as a means of reducing demand for the Chinese currency.  Expect official resistance to yuan appreciation pressures to grow.      

Data so far this week has been mixed. China’s May NBS manufacturing purchasing managers index released yesterday slipped marginally to 51.0 from 51.1 previously (consensus 51.1) while the non-manufacturing PMI increased to 55.2 from 54.9 previously. Both remained in expansion, however indicative of continued economic expansion. China’s exports are holding up particularly well and this is expected to continue to fuel manufacturing expansion while manufacturing imports are similarly strong. 

Today’s Reserve Bank of Australia decision on monetary policy delivered no surprises, with policy unchanged and attention shifting to the July meeting when the bond purchase program will be reviewed.  On Friday it’s the turn of the the Indian central bank, Reserve Bank of India (RBI), with an unchanged policy outcome likely despite the growth risks emanating from a 2nd wave COVID infections cross the country and attendant lockdowns.  Last but not least, is the May US jobs report for which consensus expectations are for 650,000 gain in non-farm payrolls and the unemployment rate falling to 5.9% from 6.1% previously.

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