What To Watch This Week

Market expectations for Fed FOMC interest rate cuts have gyrated back and forth following a recent speech by NY Fed President Williams, one of the key decision makers within the Fed FOMC. He appeared to support a 50bps rate cut at the meeting at the end of the month, but unusually this was clarified later.  If anything, as the clarification may suggest, the bigger probability is that the Fed eases policy by 25bps in an insurance cut.

There will be no Fed speakers in the days ahead but the Fed will assess developments this week in helping to determine the magnitude of easing. Attention will continue to centre on US earnings, with more than a quarter of S&P 500 companies reporting Q2 earnings this week.   On the data front, US Q2 GDP and July durable goods orders will command most attention.  The consensus looks for a slowing in GDP growth to 1.8% q/q in Q1 from 3.1% q/q in Q1 while durable goods orders are expected to increase by 0.7% m/m.

A major central bank in action this week is the European Central Bank on Thursday. While policy easing is unlikely at this meeting, the ECB is likely to set to set the market up for an easing in deposit rates at the September meeting.  ECB President Draghi could do this by strengthening his forward guidance, but as a lot of this is priced in by the market, a dovish sounding Draghi is unlikely to weigh too much on the EUR.

In the UK this week it’s all about politics. Boris Johnson is widely expected to be announced as the new Prime Minister.  GBPUSD has clung onto the 1.25 handle, as worries about a no deal Brexit continue to impact sentiment towards the currency.  Once Johnson is sworn in he and the government could face a no confidence motion, which could gain support should it be seen as an alternative to the UK crashing out of the EU.

National elections in Japan yesterday resulted in a victory according to Japanese press for Shinzo Abe’s coalition, its sixth straight victory, with the governing LDP winning over half the 124 seats. The results were no surprise, and unlikely to have a significant market impact, but notably Abe suffered a setback by not gaining a supermajority. He therefore cannot change the country’s pacifist constitution.

In emerging markets, both Russia and Turkey are likely to cut interest rates this week, with Russia predicted to cut its key rate by 25bp and Turkey to cut by at least 200bps if not more.  Elsewhere geopolitical tensions will remain a major focus for markets, as tensions between the UK and Iran intensify.

Advertisements

G20, Fed and Iran

Market attention this week will focus on Fed speakers, the G20 meeting and tensions between the US and Iran.  Here are my thoughts on all three:

Federal Reserve Chairman Powell and Vice Chair Williams are both scheduled to speak tomorrow.  Investors will be looking for any further clues on the path, timing and magnitude of Fed interest rates in the months ahead and whether they validate market expectations of easing at the July FOMC meeting.   Markets are already pricing in several cuts and a result the USD has weakened sharply over recent months, suggesting that the bar to an even more dovish stance is high.  Nonetheless, the Fed is at least likely to deliver a 25bp rate cut at the July meeting followed by at least one or two further hikes this year.

The main event this week (Fri-Sat) is the G20 meeting in Japan and in particular the potential meeting between Presidents Trump and Xi on the sidelines.  Expectations/optimism towards some form of progress on trade talks appears high.  Markets are set to remain upbeat heading into the G20, suggesting that risk assets will maintain their rally this week, which will bode well for equities. However, the reality is that the gap between both sides remain wide and there may be some positive noises emanating from the G20 on trade, concrete progress is likely to be limited.

Trump and Xi are likely to discuss a range of issues, with trade teams from both sides preparing the topics for discussion, after talks broke down last month.  It is likely that both Trump and Xi will agree to continue more formal talks, with both leaders sounding positive in the run up to the G20.  However, the threat of additional 25% US tariffs on the remaining $300bn of Chinese exports to the US, remains in place and it is unlikely that this will be taken off the table without some major concessions from China.  As I’ve previously stated it could take months before a concrete deal is agreed upon.  In the meantime global trade will continue to deteriorate.

Elsewhere geopolitical tensions remain in focus as President Trump threatens Iran with additional sanctions in an effort to force Iran to renegotiate the 2015 nuclear accord, as early as today. This follows Trump’s decision to call off planned air strikes in response to Iran’s shooting down of an unmanned drone.  Iranian oil exports have plunged as a result of sanctions and oil prices continue to react, rallying by around 8.7% in just under a week.  Markets will remain nervous over the risks of any further escalation, leaving oil prices susceptible to a further push higher.

 

%d bloggers like this: